Why Bonton Farms Dropped Out of the Lake Highlands Project and Who Will Replace It

“Everything we learned from Bonton Farms is fueling what we are doing” at the 12000 Greenville site, pictured above, City Council member Adam McGough says. “City of Refuge is best positioned to help us do what needs to be done.” (Smiley N. Pool/Staff Photographer)
“Everything we learned from Bonton Farms is fueling what we are doing” at the 12000 Greenville site, pictured above, City Council member Adam McGough says. “City of Refuge is best positioned to help us do what needs to be done.” (Smiley N. Pool/Staff Photographer)

This story, originally published in The Dallas Morning News, is reprinted as part of a collaborative partnership between The Dallas Morning News and TMN. The partnership seeks to boost coverage of Dallas’s communities of color, particularly in southern Dallas.

By Sharon Grigsby
Dallas Morning News Writer

Daron Babcock says the decision was terribly difficult because his brand is founded on the trust that he always follows through on promises.

The agriculture-centered project formerly known as Bonton Farms at Lake Highlands is moving forward without the popular South Dallas partner that inspired its creation in the first place.

Back in June, I shared the news of City Council member Adam McGough linking arms with Bonton Farms and the Georgia-based nonprofit City of Refuge to transform 12 acres of empty city-owned concrete into an innovative community asset. The urban farm would provide job training, tiny homes for transitional housing, a co-working facility, market, cafe and acres of gardens and green space.

None of that vision has changed, but who will make it happen has.

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