Legal Challenge to Dallas’s Removal of Confederate Memorials Fails in Appeals Court

In this June 24, 2020, file photo, construction workers remove the final soldier statue, which sat atop The Confederate War Memorial in downtown Dallas. The Confederate battle flag is losing its place of official prominence in the South 155 years after the end of the Civil War and some Southern localities have removed memorials and statues dedicated to the Confederate cause. (Ryan Michalesko)
In this June 24, 2020, file photo, construction workers remove the final soldier statue, which sat atop The Confederate War Memorial in downtown Dallas. The Confederate battle flag is losing its place of official prominence in the South 155 years after the end of the Civil War and some Southern localities have removed memorials and statues dedicated to the Confederate cause. (Ryan Michalesko)

This story was originally published in The Dallas Morning News, is reprinted as part of a collaborative partnership between The Dallas Morning News and TMN. The partnership seeks to boost coverage of Dallas’s communities of color, particularly in southern Dallas.

By Kevin Krause
Dallas Morning News Reporter

A group called Return Lee to Lee Park had appealed a lower court decision tossing its lawsuit against city officials for removing a Robert E. Lee statue and a Confederate war memorial from city parks.

A state appeals court has upheld a judge’s decision to toss a lawsuit against the city of Dallas for removing two Confederate monuments from separate parks.

The 5th District Court of Appeals in Dallas issued its opinion on December 28, affirming a state district judge’s ruling last year throwing out a lawsuit brought by a nonprofit group called Return Lee to Lee Park and its president, Warren Johnson, as well as Katherine Gann.

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